How to Tell If Home Staging Will Work in Your Small Town

To figure out whether or not your small town will support your home staging business, you have some homework to do. Some rural areas are great for home stagers and others, not so much. Whether or not it will work is dependent on many things, so it is wise for you to do your research…

To figure out whether or not your small town will support your home staging business, you have some homework to do.

Some rural areas are great for home stagers and others, not so much. Whether or not it will work is dependent on many things, so it is wise for you to do your research before you learn home staging and start your business.

Here are three things you can look into decide if a home staging business will work in your small town:

1. How close is the largest city? The first thing you should do is decide how far you're willing to travel for a home staging job. If you're a one hour drive to the nearest city, are you comfortable driving that far a couple of times a week to do home staging projects? If so, you can market to home owners in that city as well as your own smaller town, and neighboring ones, to supplement your income.

2. How many homes sell in a year? Contact your local real estate board and find out how many homes sold in the past year in your geographic area. Realize that only a small percentage of that number of sellers would be likely to hire you as a home stager. That will give you an idea of ​​how much potential business you would be looking at and whether or not you can earn enough to support your financial goals. It's important to note that since home staging pays so well, you may earn enough with as few as 50 to 70 clients doing mostly consultations and few full staging projects.

3. How many homes are listed in a year? While you're speaking with your contact at the real estate board find out how many homes are listed per year, on average. The number will be different from the number of sales because not all homes that go on the market stay there until they sell. If there are quite a few more homes listed than sold, you can use the percentage for the difference in your marketing materials. Presumably, if some of those homes that went off the market had been staged they would have sold quickly.